Archive
Tag "Mac"

Sud­denly, after the upgrade from Snow Leop­ard to the much vaunted OSX Lion, my wire­less trans­fers over a home LAN net­work became slug­gish. It was tak­ing a few *min­utes* to trans­fer a sim­ple file.

Appar­ently I am not the only one with these issues.

I tried a few fixes gleaned from a bunch of sep­a­rate threads on the Apple forum, and off the web. Not every­thing is a smart sug­ges­tion. Here's what finally works, so hope this saves some peo­ple with sim­i­lar prob­lems the time:

[You need root access for the "sudo" bits of the fol­low­ing code to work, of course.]

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sudo bash -c "echo 'net.inet.tcp.delayed_ack=0' >> /etc/sysctl.conf"
sudo bash -c "echo 'net.inet.tcp.recvspace=40960' >> /etc/sysctl.conf"
sudo bash -c "echo 'net.inet.tcp.rfc1323=0' >> /etc/sysctl.conf"

Make sure the sin­gle quotes remain sin­gle quotes in the above code share. These new sysctl set­tings will take effect after a reboot.

Another use­ful sug­ges­tion is to dis­able the IPV6 stuff. Not needed for now. Done using:


System Preferences ->
Network ->
Airport (or your WiFi listing) ->
Advanced (button) ->
TCP/IP (tab)

Change the IPV6 to "Link — Local".

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If you're here, you know what I'm talk­ing about. The Safari plu­gin sounds like a neat lit­tle tool but is a pesky cus­tomer on any com­puter. Not the way to win hearts. Delet­ing it doesn't work, not do the instruc­tions on their website.

Here is how I did.

  1. First, close Safari. This is VERY impor­tant, as it does not work otherwise.
  2. Start Ter­mi­nal. (Go to Appli­ca­tions -> Util­i­ties -> Ter­mi­nal, or type Ter­mi­nal in Spotlight).
  3. Under Ter­mi­nal type "sudo –s" with­out the quo­ta­tion marks to log in as root.
  4. Then enter:
    defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
  5. Go to the blue (or gray) apple at the top left of the screen, then select Force Quit. From the menu of items, click on "Saft" and click on the Force Quit button.
  6. Then, in the same Force Quit win­dow, click on "Finder" and click the "Relaunch" button.
  7. In the Finder win­dow, on the top right bar (the Fil­ter spot­light bar), type "saft" with­out the quotes. Delete with delight any file called Saft. Note: This may reveal a few other files that may con­tain the word "Saft" such as threads.py in my case (a Python file). Nat­u­rally, you want to NOT delete these. Just get rid of the Saft files.
  8. Empty the trash. If there is a file that won't delete because it's in use, then Force Quit "Saft" again as in Step 5 above, and then Empty Trash again.
  9. Go back into Ter­mi­nal, and type "sudo –s" again with­out quo­ta­tion marks. Then enter:
     defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles FALSE

    This will set the Finder back to the way it was before. Then type "exit" and it will exit out of the root.

  10. Now nav­i­gate to the folder: /Library/InputManagers. Note that this is NOT the "Library" folder in your Users folder. This is the Library folder from the root. Inside Input­Man­agers is the "saft" folder — get rid of it.
  11. Empty Trash (again). If it says Saft is in use, reboot the machine and empty it then. Or if you use some excel­lent util­ity like Main­Menu you can "Force Empty Trash".

Go back to your happy, prob­lem free Mac!  :)

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Finally, we can (hope­fully) test Safari on Win­dows too, but it remains to be seen how this com­pares with Fire­fox and its bat­tal­ion of exten­sions and the ever-blazing Opera.

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If not to make things sim­pler for you, then for the sheer delight of it, it's kind of fun to make your Win­dows PC look like a Mac. A full theme from Fly­aki­teOSX, sounds and all, makes it a breeze.

Want a Mac look on your Win­dows machine? Skins and themes would be nice, but there's more to that when you want to REALLY emu­late a Mac OSX inter­face entirely. There are plenty of pro­grams avail­able to emu­late spe­cific fea­tures of OSX, e.g. Finder, icons, etc [exam­ple].

But Fly­akite OSX is a project that's look­ing mature, and it comes with a very com­plete theme, includ­ing sounds and mouse cur­sors and Explorer cus­tomiza­tion, things you don't typ­i­cally expect from a sim­ple 'theme'.

The web­site goes for a Mac look itself, which is a bit painful, but it's worth the download.

Before you go for it, some caveats

  1. The per­for­mance of your machine in gen­eral may be affected, of course. Not too much though.
  2. The theme does fun­da­men­tally change some core files like Explorer.exe but (a) it makes a backup so you can go back with a sim­ple unin­stall, and (b) it doesn't screw up any addi­tional func­tion­al­ity like my Groove but­ton on my Explorer bar.
  3. I don't like shad­ows under my win­dows, but that seems to built-in in the skin.
  4. Some things like Win­dows Media Player will not change. WMP has its own skin, which remains untouched.
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Robert Cring­ley of PBS isn't happy with merely a tech col­umn. He wants his own TV show, down­load­able from the PBS web­site of course in true geek spirit.

Can't get enough nerdi­ness on Slash­dot and Kuro5hin? Start­ing Sept. 6, PBS will broad­cast a Web-exclusive down­load­able series fea­tur­ing the best of the nerd lot.

Dubbed NerdTVâ„¢ ?, the series of 13 one-hour shows will be hosted by tech­nol­ogy colum­nist and indus­try insider Robert X. Cringely.

Cringely, author of "Acci­den­tal Empires: How the Boys of Sil­i­con Val­ley Make Their Mil­lions, Bat­tle For­eign Com­pe­ti­tion, and Still Can't Get a Date," will inter­view such nerd nota­bles as Pay-Pal co-founder Max Levchin, orig­i­nal Mac­in­tosh pro­gram­mer Andy Hertzfeld and Bill Joy, father of Berke­ley UNIX.

In a col­umn on pbs.org last week, Cringely offered a bunch of nerd-friendly pro­duc­tion and for­mat specs for the series and stressed that NerdTV will be dis­trib­uted under a Cre­ative Com­mons license, which means view­ers can redis­trib­ute the shows at will. Which is an inter­est­ing devel­op­ment, the CC license is begin­ning to be her­alded among music cir­cles as well, because it affords an artist the abil­ity to remix and mash licensed songs as they see fit for non-commercial pur­poses. Per­son­ally, I can't wait to make my own 'remixed' ver­sions of Cringely's show for my own nefar­i­ous purposes.

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